The chargeable weight for your packages will vary depending on the ship option and the country from which they are shipped.

We will explain how we calculate the weights for any package in this article, what they are, and what you need to know. If you have any questions about what your chargeable weight is, please consult your Account Manager or our merchant care team at support@shipbob.com.


What is actual weight?

A product's actual weight is its total weight, including packaging.

What is dimensional weight?

Dimensional weight, also called DIM weight, takes into account the length, width and height of the package that you are shipping.

Depending on the region you ship from and the carrier used for the shipment, the chargeable weight will be whichever number is greater: the actual weight of the package or its calculated dimensional weight.

Dim divisor by country

In some countries, the DIM divisor will be different depending on if you’re shipping domestically or internationally.

Use this table as your guide to understanding the DIM divisor in each country (for both domestic and international shipments):

Country

Domestic Dim Divisor

Applies when

International Dim Divisor

Applies when

United States

166

Actual weight >=1lb

139

Any weight

Canada

139

Any weight

139

Any weight

United Kingdom

139

Any weight

139

Any weight

Australia

139

Any weight

139

Any weight

Poland

139

Any weight

139

Any weight

Ireland

139

Any weight

139

Any weight


How to calculate the DIM weight:

To calculate dimensional (DIM) weight, multiply the length, width, and height of a package, using the longest point on each side. Then, divide the cubic size of the package in inches by the DIM divisor* to calculate the dimensional weight in pounds.

*The DIM divisor varies based on carriers, shipping method and destination, and origin of shipment.

Steps to calculate dimensional weight:

  1. Measure the length, width and height of a package, using the longest point on each side.* These measurements should take into account any bulges or misshapen sides, as irregularities can incur special handling fees if not incorporated into the initial calculations for dimensional weight.

*Most shipping carriers request you round up to the nearest whole number.

  1. Multiply those package dimensions to get the cubic size of the package. For example, if your package is 30 inches by 12 inches by 12 inches, your package size is the product of these three measurements multiplied: 4,320 cubic inches.

  2. Divide the cubic size of the package by the DIM divisor. DIM divisors are numbers set by the major freight carriers, such as UPS and FedEx. These factors represent cubic inches per pound.

    A few examples:

    Origin of shipment: US

Destination: Domestic

Actual weight: 21 pounds

Length: 30 inches

Width: 12 inches

Height: 12 inches

Cubic size calculation: 30 x 12 x 12 = 4,320 cubic inches

Dimensional weight calculation: 4,320 / 166 = 26 pounds

Destination: International

Actual weight: 21 pounds

Length: 30 inches

Width: 12 inches

Height: 12 inches

Cubic size calculation: 30 x 12 x 12 = 4,320 cubic inches

Dimensional weight calculation: 4,320 / 139 = 31 pounds

Origin of shipment: Canada, United Kingdom, Poland, Ireland and Australia

Destination: Domestic

Actual weight: 21 pounds

Length: 30 inches

Width: 12 inches

Height: 12 inches

Cubic size calculation: 30 x 12 x 12 = 4,320 cubic inches

Dimensional weight calculation: 4,320 / 139= 31 pounds

Destination: International

Actual weight: 21 pounds

Length: 30 inches

Width: 12 inches

Height: 12 inches

Cubic size calculation: 30 x 12 x 12 = 4,320 cubic inches

Dimensional weight calculation: 4,320 / 139 = 31 pounds


As a reminder, whether you are charged actual or dimensional weight, as well as what DIM divisor is used, varies based on the origin of the shipment, shipping method, destination, and origin of the shipment.

If you have any questions about what your chargeable weight is, please consult your Account Manager or our merchant care team at support@shipbob.com.

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